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Comics, I kind of hate you right now

betterlivingthroughjunkculture:

wonderali:

I haven’t read comics in about two months now. Aside from a few general pieces here and there, I haven’t written about comics in about a year. There are some things about the comics community that are pretty ugly. And those things are getting in the way of my enjoyment of comics. What’s killing it for me is the harassment former DC editor, current Comics Alliance writer, and all-around awesome lady Janelle Asselin is trying to dig into and, in the process, has become a target of.

For the time I was writing somewhat regularly about comics, I was discouraged from writing about “uncomfortable” topics like sexism or feminism. This wasn’t for all the sites I wrote for. But I did get the feeling I was allowed to hang out in the special tree house with the boys as long as I acted like one of the boys and didn’t turn into one of those uppity feminists. And I get wanting to keep the focus on comics and the great things about them. Trust me, I would love to go back to the days of unabashedly adoring comics.

But that’s not enough anymore.

It’s easy to say women should be able to do everything a man can do: they can be astronauts and writers and scientists and the President of the United States if they work for it, they should be paid the same wages as their male counterparts, they should have the right to vote and drive a car and do everyday people things without hinderance, etc.

But that’s not where gender equality ends. People should be allowed to express a dissenting opinion on the internet without being threatened with rape; people should be allowed to have consensual sex without being labeled a whore; people should be allowed to wear whatever they want without being groped or demeaned; people should be allowed to express themselves in ways that do not conform to narrow, antiquated definitions of “gender” without being disrespected or physically attacked. And come on, people. This is obvious stuff.

So when someone gets catcalled or threatened or browbeaten, you have to stand up and say NO. And look, I get that’s uncomfortable and confrontational and hard, honestly hard, to do. I’m guilty of not saying anything, of plowing along with my head in the sand and just gushing over my funny pages. But like I said, that’s not enough anymore. We need to have this conversation; we need to call this bullshit behavior out.

Because ignoring the harassment is condoning it. It undermines the severity of the situation. It tells the victims that we care more about their attackers than we do about them. Not to mention, the instances when people flat out tell victims of harassment that they’re exaggerating the facts, or “that’s not what he meant” or “get over it and stop being so emotional.”

And that is fucked up. Seriously fucked up. We need to do better, people. We need to do a lot better.

Good points, all.  Repeat this.  Often and loudly.

Cosigned.

Source: wonderali
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nprplays:

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

Something to ponder today as you slay Internet dragons and blast enemy troops.

(via benrchee)

Source: smashsurvey
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comedycentral:

Click here to watch Samantha Bee and Jason Jones talk about this classic segment on The Daily Show Correspondent Spotlight: Behind the Spotlight.

Sam Bee forever!

Source: comedycentral
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postmodernbarney:

Lying with charts. See if you can spot the huge problem here before clicking the source.

Reminder: Always check the y axis labels.

And if there are no y axis labels, that chart can’t be trusted (unless there are datapoint labels).

Source: freethoughtblogs.com
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postmodernbarney:

bechnokid:

youneedacat:

tenlittlebullets:

rosemecanique:

stripedteacups:

qhuinn:

chasingshhadows:

There are a lot of problems facing social justice movements today, but this is the biggest one. Because it’s holding us back internally. People learn and read about social issues and oppression and abuse online and suddenly they think they know everything. And of course they’re angry - there’s a lot to be angry about. And yes, it’s a great, wonderful thing that they’re aware and are working to better themselves.

But omgosh, please just stop trying to teach it and spread it because you are doing it wrong. Lashing out and yelling out buzzwords and SJ jargon and calling people racist and sexist and writing people off with no compassion - these are literally the opposite of what we should be doing. Anyone who’s actually been trained in social justice, SJ communication, facilitation and dialogue sees that and gets embarrassed to be associated with that form of “social justice.” 

Because it’s not social justice. It’s not fighting racism and sexism and classism and homophobia. All it’s doing it’s turning people off, closing their minds further and making everyone who knows what they’re doing look bad. All it’s doing is spreading more hate, more negativity and generally making everyone feel like shit about themselves - except of course for the OP, who feels great about themselves for supposedly doing their part and helping the movement. 

But they’re not. All they’re helping is the oppressive structure holding everyone back.

I’ve been there. I’ve been pissed off and angry and lashing out at everyone and everything. And it bit me in the ass more times than I can tell you. So I stopped and I learned. I was trained in social justice education by the university that developed the most widely accepted program for social justice education. I have practical experience, both in my daily life and in dialogue, that proves that these methods are not only better, but the only ones that actually work

That showing compassion for agents and those who are uneducated gets you much farther than writing them off as hateful assholes and refusing to teach them in a way they can understand. That listening to where a person is coming from is far more important than listening to what they say. That we must all understand that most *people* are not maliciously racist/sexist/classist/ableist, but the society we were all raised in *is*

We are all trying to work within this structure set in place long before any of our great grandparents were born and we all have our own starting point on the journey

The other, possibly biggest and most widespread problem among the untrained crowd is the complete and total lack of understanding of teacher/learner. You do not know everything. You only know your own experiences. That’s it. In order to actually teach someone about social justice, you have to teach them about your own experiences. In order to do that, you must be willing to learn theirs, too. You must have compassion and empathy or you will get nowhere. This is literally the most important thing I ever learned and it’s the one that I see lacking the most in online SJ. 

Now this is specifically directed at fandoms (and more specifically the Teen Wolf fandom, which I call home) but this is a message for everyone. It pains me to see the field that I am so incredibly passionate about get dragged through the mud because people who consider themselves to be a part of it do such horrible things in such horrible ways. Online SJ has a bad name because it has earned it and I cannot tell you how much I hate that. Social justice is not only my work, but it is also my life. I will not stand any longer for people abusing it and using it to spread hate.

THIS.

OPEN LETTER TO EVERY FUCKING FANDOM ON TUMBLR/TWITTER, GODDAMMIT. GET A GRIP, FUCKING HELL.

     (x)

Oh god can I just reblog this once a week so EVERYONE gets to fucking read it?

Tumblr “social justice” is a fucking travesty that values self-righteous fury as an argument sufficient unto itself and devalues careful, measured reasoning as “coddling bigots.” That praises and rewards the shutting-down of communication. That teaches smug superiority and frowns on compassion and empathy. That took “lashing out in anger is an unproductive but somewhat excusable reaction to injustice, and is not a reason to dismiss a sound argument” and dragged it into the realm of “everyone subject to systematic oppression has an absolute right to lash out in anger to whatever extent they please, and no one else has the right to criticize their behavior or be hurt by it,” and thence into an echo chamber where performative displays of anger become the goal of communication.

I’m not pretending to sainthood here. Getting patted on the butt for a righteous smackdown is dangerously seductive, especially when you have a short temper on certain subjects. And the danger of this particular echo chamber is that it’s easy for normal, intelligent, well-meaning people to get sucked into it. But it’s not a healthy model of communication. Healthy models of communication (a) encourage empathy and reasoned dialogue and frown on incoherent rage explosions, and (b) treat anger, rudeness and cruelty as undesireable but sometimes excusable—in proportion to the provocation and the circumstances. Tumblr “social justice” rejects any notion of proportionate response and has its priorities in communication neatly reversed.

My friend who did actual work in social justice long long before the internet gets really embarrassed and disturbed by what gets called social justice around here sometimes.

#thank #getting angry about things is COMPLETELY understandable #yelling at people does no good howeve r#it never fucking works

Couldn’t have said it better, myself!

Oh thank all that is good and holy for this.

So glad to hear someone say this. I joke sometimes about being professionally outraged but I try to stop and thin before getting my outrage fully on.

1. Not every offensive thing ever said is said with deliberate intent. People say stupid things by accident and sometimes privilege means you come out of a world where you don’t realize how much certain words can hurt. In those moments of ignorance, that’s when the first step should be an attempt at education. Ignorance and cluelessness are usually far more likely than outright malice. Just because your ear is tuned to hear bigoted language, that’s not how everyone hears a turn of phrase.

2. Someone asking you to clarify your anger isn’t “-spaining” but trying to have a dialogue. A question like, “Was it that word or the context?” isn’t a dismissal (yes, it could lead to a dismissal) but an attempt to better understand what the problem is.

Source: chasingshhadows
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jonnyandthekits:

I was like WHAAAAAT?!?

Source: jonnyandthekits
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mtv:

i would applaud myself too tbh

He found a shirt with snaps. He came prepared to tear his shirt open several times that night. If I looked like him I would too.

Source: mtv
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Every time I watch Game of Thrones I have to resist the urge to look up spoilers, hoping that Joffrey dies horribly very, very soon.

Oh, heck, make it everyone with Lannister blood taller than 5’6”

(I have a feeling if I did look up spoilers, it would probably tell me Joffrey is alive and well, being more awful than ever.)

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Want.
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After hearing the same question over and over from friends and family — “Why aren’t you married yet?” — art director Suzanne Heintz got tired of it and set out to do something about it. She got herself a little family…of mannequins.

Over the course of 14 years and 10,000 miles of travel, she took her fake family everywhere and took all kinds of “family” pictures….

I loved the comment of Laura:

 She’s underlining the fact that for many people, a family seems to be little better than a trophy or badge to prove that someone has succeeded at fulfilling society’s expectations of them. How many families look great in photographs but are actually empty inside? The point is not to condemn family life, but to refuse to accept that a good life is simply one that looks good to other people.

Amazing.

(via mrgolightly)

Source: lickystickypickyshe